The Battle of Perryville

The Generals

Union Leaders - Army of the Ohio


Major General Horatio G. Wright - Commander Department of Ohio

Wright was born in Clinton, Connecticut on March 6, 1820. He graduated second in his class from West Point in 1841 and was assigned to the Army Corp of Engineers. He spent ten years in Florida with the construction of Forts Taylor and Jefferson. He was at the Norfolk Naval Yard at the start of the Civil War where he failed in his assignment to destroy the dry dock. He was captured when the Confederates took control of the Naval Yard on April 20, 1861. Wright served as General Heintzelman's Chief Engineer during the Battle of 1st Manassas. He was promoted to Brigadier General on September 16, 1861 and was at the Battle of Secessionville. His advancement to Major General was on July 18, 1862, but was later revoked on March 24, 1863. Wright would be re-appointed to Major General on May 12, 1864. He would replace Major General Sedgwick as the 6th Corps Commander during the Overland Campaign of 1864, following Sedgwick's death. Wright's 6th Corps would rescue Washington, D.C. during Early's raid and fight with Sheridan in the Shenandoah. The 6th Corps would also lead the breakthrough of the Confederate defenses at Petersburg. He was brevetted Major General in the regular army in April 1865. Following the war, Wright reverted to Lieutenant Colonel in the Corps of Engineers and advanced to Colonel and Brigadier General in 1879. His post war projects included the completion of the Washington Monument. He retired from the army on his birthday at age 64. He lived in Washington and died there on July 2, 1899. General Wright is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Major General William "Bull" Nelson - Commander Army of Kentucky

Nelson was born in Maysville, KY on September 27, 1824. He attended Norwich Academy in Vermont from 1837 to 1839. In 1840 he was appointed a midshipman in the U.S. Navy. During the Mexican War, he saw service during the Siege of Vera Cruz. He was advanced to Lieutenant in 1855. With the beginning of the Civil War, President Lincoln sent Nelson to Kentucky to recruit Kentuckians during touchy period of neutrality. Nelson established Camp Dick Robinson in Garrard County. He was promoted to Brigadier General on September 16, 1861 and was a brigade commander during the Battle of Shiloh. He was advance to Major General on July 19, 1862. Nelson was the only naval officer to become a Major General for either side. Bull Nelson would be defeated at the Battle of Richmond on August 30, 1862. Jefferson C. Davis at the Galt House in Louisville, KY killed him on September 30, 1862. Nelson is buried in Maysville, KY.
Brigadier General Mahlon Dickerson Manson - Corps Commander Army of Kentucky

Manson was born on February 20, 1820 in Piqua, OH. He moved to Montgomery County, Indiana where he taught school for a year. From 1847 to 1848, he studied medicine in Cincinnati. During the Mexican War, he served as a captain in the 5th Indiana. Following the war he was a druggist in Crawfordsville, IN and served in the Indiana legislature. The beginning of the Civil War found Manson enlisting as a captain in the 10th Indiana and elected Colonel in May 1861. He was at Rich Mountain and Mill Springs. Promoted to Brigadier General on March 24, 1862, he lead the Union forces during the initial phase of the Battle of Richmond where he was wounded and captured. He would be wounded again at Resaca during the Atlanta Campaign while serving as a brigade commander. The wound led to he resignation for the army on December 21 1864. He would serve an Indiana Congressman from 1871 to 1873. Mason died in Crawfordsville, IN on February 2, 1895 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery.
Major General Don Carlos Buell - Commander Army of the Ohio

Buell was born in Lowell, Ohio on March 23, 1818. An uncle in Lawrenceburg, IN raised him. He was an 1841 graduate of West Point. Upon graduation, he was assigned to the 3rd US Infantry and station in Florida fighting the Seminole Indians. In the Mexican War he was wounded during the Battle of Churubusco and received brevets to Captain and Major. Buell served 13 years in the Adjutant Generals Department. With the start of the Civil War, Don Carlos Buell was commissioned a Brigadier General of Volunteers on May 17,1861. He initial assignment was to the Army of the Potomac to assist in training. He was advanced to Major General on March 22, 1862, when George McClellan transferred him to command of the Army of the Ohio. Buell was involved in the Battle of Shiloh and the Corinth campaign. Following the Kentucky Campaign, Buell was relieved of command due to his poor performance. He was mustered out of the army in May 1864 and resigned his commission June 1, 1864. Following his army career, Buell operated an ironworks and coal mine in Kentucky. He served as a Government Pension Agent from 1885-89. Buell died in the now abandoned village of Airdrie, KY near Paradise on November 19, 1898. He is buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis.
Major General George Henry Thomas - Second in Command Army of the Ohio

George Thomas was born on July 31, 1816 in Southampton County, Virginia. In 1831 he fled with his family during the Nat Turner slave revolt. An 1840 graduate from West Point, he spent 15 years in the artillery. During the Mexican War, Thomas was twice brevetted for gallantry during the Battles of Monterey and Buena Vista. Following the Mexican was he was assigned to the 2nd US Cavalry where he served as major under the command of Albert S. Johnston, Robert E. Lee and William Hardee. Thomas applied to be Commandant of Cadets at Virginia Military Institute in January 1861, but failed to receive the appointment. With the start of the Civil War, Thomas turned down the offer to be Virginia's Chief of Ordnance remaining loyal to the Union. For this action, his family disavowed him. Thomas was commission Brigadier General on August 17, 1861. He was responsible for the first significant victory for the Union at the Battle of Mill Springs in January 1862. Following the Battle of Shiloh, he was advance to Major General on April 25, 1862. Thomas was instrumental in Union victories in the Corinth and Kentucky Campaigns and Union victories at Stone's River and Chattanooga. He earned the name the “Rock of Chickamauga” for his efforts that battle. Thomas would become command of the Army of the Cumberland and lead the army during the Atlanta Campaign and the victory over the Confederate Army of Tennessee at Nashville. After the war, President Andrew Johnson, tried to have Thomas supercede Grant as Commander of the US Armies, but Thomas refused. At his request, Thomas was appointed to the Department of Pacific in 1869. He died in San Francisco of a stroke on March 28, 1870 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Troy, NY.
Major General Alexander McDowell McCook - Commander 1st Corps Army of the Ohio

Alexander was born in Columbiana County, OH on April 22, 1831. He attained the highest ranking of any of the 14 “Fighting McCooks”. He was a graduate of West Point in 1852 and would serve as an instructor of tactics at the school. At the beginning of the Civil War, he was commissioned Colonel of the 1st Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He found at the Battle of First Manassas. He received his appointment to Brigadier General on September 3, 1861 and Major General in July 1862. He would have Corps command through the Battle of Chickamauga. McCook received some of the blame for the Union disaster, but would be exonerated by a Court of Inquiry. He spent the remainder of the war awaiting orders. Post war, he served as Lieutenant Colonel of the 26th Infantry until 1867. He was advanced to Colonel in 1880, Brigadier General in 1889 and Major General in 1894. McCook retired from the US Army in 1895. He died in Dayton, Ohio on June 12, 1903and is buried in Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati with the rest of the McCook family.
Brigadier General Lovell Harrison Rousseau - Commander 3rd Division 1st Corps

Lovell Rousseau was born on August 4, 1818 near Stanford, KY. When his father died, Rousseau was 15 years old. He became a common labor in Lexington. He studied law and in 1840 was admitted to the bar in Indiana. He lived in Bloomfield. In 1844, he entered politics and was elected to the Indiana legislature. He served as a Captain in the 2nd Indiana during the Mexican War. Rousseau served as an Indiana State Senator from 1847 through 1849. After, his tour as senator, he moved to Louisville, KY and practiced law. He was elected to the Kentucky Senate in1860 and would resign he position to become Colonel of the 3rd Kentucky Infantry. He was advance to Brigadier General on October 1, 1861. He was promoted to Major General for his service during the Battle of Perryville to date from October 8, 1862. He would command the District of Nashville from November 1863 through November 1865. He resigned from the Army in 1865 to take a seat as Congressman from Kentucky. Rousseau would be censured for caning Josiah Grinnell of Iowa and resign only to be reelected. Rousseau would continue in the Army after the war, advancing to Brigadier and Major General. He was sent to Alaska to receive control of the land from Russia. In 1868, Rousseau would replace Sheridan as Commander of the Department of Louisiana. He died January 7, 1869 in New Orleans and is buried in Arlington Cemetery.
Colonel Leonard A. Harris - Commander 9th Brigade 3rd Division 1st Corps

Colonel Harris was killed during the Battle of Perryville on October 8, 1862.
Colonel William Haines Lytle - Commander 17th Brigade 3rd Division 1st Corps

Born on November 2, 1826 in Cincinnati, OH, Lytle was a lawyer and poet. He served as a Lieutenant in the 2nd Ohio Infantry during the Mexican War rising to the rank of captain. Governor Salmon Chase would appoint him Major General in the Ohio Militia in 1857. At the start of the Civil War, Lytle was commissioned Colonel of the 10th Ohio on May 3, 1861. He was wounded at Carnifax Ferry and again at Perryville. He was appointed Brigadier General on November 29, 1862. Lytle was killed at the Battle of Chickamauga on September 20, 1863 trying to stop the Confederate breakthrough. He is buried at Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati, OH.
Colonel John Converse Starkweather - Commander 28th Brigade 3rd Division 1st Corps

John Starkweather was born on May 11, 1830 in Cooperstown, NY. Educated at Union College in Schenectady, NJ, were he studied law. He moved to Milwaukee to set up his practice. With the beginning of the Civil War, Starkweather enlisted for three months in the 1st Wisconsin and was elected Colonel. The 1st Wisconsin was initially assigned to the Army of Observation and was involved in the action at Edwards Ferry, MD. Upon re-enlisting, the 1st Wisconsin was transferred to Kentucky. Starkweather was given a brigade command in the reorganization during the Kentucky Campaign. He fought at Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga and Chattanooga. He was promoted to Brigadier General on July 17, 1863. In December 1864, Starkweather applied for duty with General Sheridan, but was rejected. This may have been as a result of serving on the court martial board that dismissed Surgeon General W. A. Hammond. General Starkweather resigned from the army on May 11, 1865 and returned to Milwaukee to farm and practice law. Later he moved to the Washington, D.C. area to prosecute claims against the U. S. Government. He died in Washington on November 14, 1890 and is buried in Forest Home Cemetery in Milwaukee.
Brigadier General Joshua Woodrow Sill - Commander 2nd Division 1st Corps

Sill was born in Chillicothe, OH on December 6, 1831. He graduated third in the West Point class of 1853. Sill served as an instructor at West Point from 1857 until 1860. On January 25, 1861, he resigned from the army to become professor of mathematics and civil engineering at the Collegiate Polytechnic Institute in Brooklyn New York. At the start of the Civil War, he was appointed Adjutant General for the State of Ohio. On August 27, 1861 he was appointed Colonel of the 33rd OVI and took part in the Andrew's Raid (Great Locomotive Chase) in April 1862. Advance to Brigadier General on July 16, 1862, he was assigned to the 2nd Division. Sill was killed during the Battle of Stones River on December 31, 1862. He is buried in Grand View Cemetery near Chillicothe, OH.
Brigadier General James Streshly Jackson - Commander 10th Division 1st Corps

Jackson was born in Fayette County, KY on September 27, 1823. Educated at Center College in Danville, KY; Jefferson College in Cannonsburg, PA; and law at Transylvania University in Lexington, KY, he set up a law practice in Greenupsburg, KY in 1845. Jackson entered the Mexican War as a private in the 1st Kentucky Cavalry but was appointed as 3rd Lieutenant. He resigned after fighting a duel with the unit's colonel to avoid a court martial. In 1860, he was elected to Congress from Kentucky. Jackson resigned his Congressional seat to become the Colonel of the 3rd Kentucky Cavalry. He was appointed Brigadier General on July 19, 1862 and assigned to the cavalry in Nelson's Army of Kentucky. He was transferred to the infantry in September 1862. James Jackson was killed in action at the Battle of Perryville and is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Hopkinsville, KY.
Brigadier General William Rufus Terrill - Commander 33rd Brigade 10th Division 1st Corps

Born on April 21, 1834 in Covington, VA, Terrill grew up in Warm Springs, VA. He graduate in 1853 from West Point and assigned to the artillery. He saw garrison duty in Florida fighting the Seminole Indians. Terrill also served as a mathematics instructor at West Point. He agreed to remain loyal to the Union when the Civil War commenced provided that he would not be required to serve in Virginia. On May 14, 1861 he received an assignment as Captain in the 5th US Artillery and sent to Kentucky. He was Chief of Artillery for the 2nd Division of the Army of the Ohio from January through June of 1862. Advanced to Brigadier General on September 9, 1862, he was transferred to an infantry command by Major General Horatio Wright. Terrill was killed during the Battle of Perryville on October 8, 1862 and is buried at West Point.
Colonel George Webster - Commander 34th Brigade 10th Division 1st Corps

Colonel Webster was killed during the Battle of Perryville on October 8, 1862.
Major General Thomas Leonidas Crittenden - Command 2nd Corps Army of the Ohio

Thomas Crittenden was the son of Kentucky Senator John J. Crittenden and brother of Confederate Major General George B. Crittenden. He was born May 15, 1819 in Russellville, KY. Crittenden was admitted to the Kentucky bar in 1840 and became Commonwealth District Attorney in 1842. He volunteered during the Mexican War and served as an aide to General Zachary Taylor and Colonel of the 3rd Kentucky Infantry. In 1849, Crittenden was appointed as US Consul to Liverpool. At the start of the Civil War, he was commissioned Brigadier General in September 1861 and Major General on July 17, 1862. Along with fellow Corps Commander Alexander McCook, Crittenden was blamed for the Union disaster at Chickamauga. He would be exonerated. He resigned in December 1864. In January 1866, he as appointed state treasurer for Kentucky. President Johnson offered him a position as Colonel in the US Army, which he accepted. Crittenden would serve until he retired in 1881. He died on October 23, 1893 in Annandale, Staten Island, NY and is buried in Frankfort, KY.
Brigadier General William Sooy Smith - Commander 4th Division 2nd Corps

Smith was born July 22, 1830 in Tarleton, OH. He graduated from Ohio University in 1849 and West Point in 1853. He resigned after graduation and became an engineer with the Illinois Central Railroad. At the beginning of the Civil War he organized an engineering company. On June 26, 1861 he was commissioned Colonel of the 13th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He served in West Virginia and at the Battle of Shiloh. He was promoted to Brigadier General in April 1862. Smith was assigned as Chief of Cavalry for both Grant and Sherman. His defeat by Nathan B. Forrest in March 1864 leads to his resignation from the army on July 15, 1864. He became a farmer in Oak Park, IL. Smith built the first all steel bridge over the Missouri River at Glasgow, Missouri and contributed to the science o engineering on bridge and skyscraper underpinnings. He was influential in all skyscraper construction in Chicago until he retired in 1910. He moved to Medford, Oregon where he died March 4, 1916. Smith is buried in Forest Home Cemetery in Riverside, IL.
Colonel William Grose - Commander 10th Brigade 4th Division 2nd Corps

Colonel Grose was born near Dayton, Ohio on December 16, 1812. As an infant his family moved to Fayette County and then Henry County in Indiana. He was an attorney and set up practice in New Castle. In 1861 he was elected as a Common Pleas Judge. Grose was elected as Colonel of the 36th Indiana on October 23, 1861. He served with the Armies of the Ohio and Cumberland through the Atlanta Campaign. On July 30, 1864 he was promoted to Brigadier General. He was at Franklin and Nashville. He was brevetted to Major General on August 13, 1865 and resigned on January 31, 1866. He served as Collector of Internal Revenue for New Castle, IN from 1866 until 1874. In 1887 he was elected to the Indiana Senate. Grose would publish the history of the 36th Indiana. He died on July 30, 1900 in his home in New Castle and is buried in Smith Mound Cemetery.
Colonel William Babcock Hazen - Commander 19th Brigade 4th Division 2nd Corps

Hazen was born in West Hartford, VT on September 27, 1830. When he was 3, his family moved to Hiram, Ohio. Hazen was a graduate of West Point with the famed Class of 1846. He served in the Pacific Northwest and Texas. Being wound while fighting the Comanche Indians in 1959, he was still on sick leave in 1861 when the war began. Initially, Hazen was Captain in the 8th Indiana, but was appointed Colonel of the 41st Ohio in October. He held a brigade command at Shiloh. In April of 1863, Hazen was promoted to Brigadier General and to Major General in 1865. He would serve with the Army of the Cumberland through the end of the war. In July 1866 he was given command of the 38th US Infantry and transferred to the 6th US in 1869. Hazen served as an observer with the German Armies during the Franco-Prussian War. In 1880, President Hayes appointed Hazen as Chief Signal Officer with the rank of Brigadier General. Hazen died in Washington, D.C. on January 16, 1887 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Brigadier General Charles Cruft - Commander 22nd Brigade 4th Division 2nd Corps

Cruft was born in Terre Haute, IN on January 12, 1826. He was educated at Wabash College and graduated in 1842. Cruft was a schoolteacher and a bank clerk prior to studying law. From 1855 until 1858, Cruft was President of the St. Louis, Alton and Terra Haute Railroad. He would be a spectator at the Battle of 1st Manassas. On September 9, 1861 he became Colonel of the 31st Indiana and fought at Fort Donelson and Corinth. He was promoted to Brigadier General on July 16, 1862 and commanded a division for the Battle of Richmond. His brigade was not engaged at Perryville. He would see action at Stones River, Chickamauga, and Chattanooga. He commanded a provisional division at Nashville. In March 1965, he received a brevet to Major General. He mustered out of the army on August 24, 1865 when he returned to practice law in Terre Haute. Cruft died on March 23, 1883 in Terra Haute and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery.
Brigadier General Horatio Phillip Van Cleve - Commander 5th Division 2nd Corps

Van Cleve was born in Princeton, NJ on November 23, 1809. He was educated at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) and West Point. He was a graduate of the Class of 1831. Van Cleve served on garrison duty in Wisconsin until his resignation in 1836. After resigning, Van Cleve was a farmer near Monroe, Michigan; a teacher in Cincinnati, OH; a civil engineer for the state of Michigan; US surveyor of public lands in Minnesota and from 1856-61 a stockman in Minnesota. Van Cleve was commissioned Colonel of the 2nd Minnesota. He fought at the Battle of Mill Springs. Van Cleve would be advance to Brigadier General on March 21, 1862. His brigade would be shattered at Chickamauga. Following that battle he was assigned to command at Murfreesboro. He would receive the brevet to Major General in March 1865. Post war, he served as Adjutant General for the state of Minnesota from 1866-70 and 1876-82. He was postmaster at St. Anthony, MN from 1871 through 1873. Van Cleve died on April 27, 1891 in Minneapolis and is buried in Lakewood Cemetery.
Colonel Samuel Beatty - Commander 11th Brigade 5th Division 2nd Corps

Sam Beatty was born on December 16, 1820 in Mifflin County, PA. His family moved to Stark County, Ohio in 1829. In 1846, he enlisted in the 3rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry and served as a 1st Lieutenant during the Mexican War. In 1857, Beatty would become Sheriff of Stark County. On April 27, 1861, he again entered the military as Captain in the 19th OVI and became Colonel on May 29, 1861. The regiment saw action at Shiloh and Corinth. Following Perryville, Beatty was promoted to Brigadier General on November 29, 1862. He remained with the Army of the Cumberland and was brevetted Major General on March 13, 1865, being discharged from the army on January 15, 1866. Beatty returned to Ohio to be a farmer. He died on May 25, 1885 and is buried in Massillon City Cemetery.
Colonel Pierce B. Hawkins - Commander 14th Brigade 5th Division 2nd Corps

Colonel Stanley Matthews - Commander 23rde Brigade 5th Division 2nd Corps

Brigadier General Thomas John Wood - Commander 6th Division 2nd Corps

Thomas Wood was born on September 25, 1823 in Munfordville, KY. He was educated at West Point where he graduated with the Class of 1845. During the Mexican War, he was brevetted for gallantry at the Battle of Buena Vista. After the war he was assigned to duty of the frontier fighting Indians. He received a Volunteer commission as Brigadier General on October 11, 1861. At Chickamauga, he received the order from General Rosecrans that opened the hole in the Union lines that contributed to the disaster. He would command the Union 4th Corps during the Battle of Nashville. Wood was promoted to Major General on February 22, 1865. He retired from the army on June 9, 1869 and moved to Dayton, OH. He served on the Military Academy Board of Visitors. He died on February 25, 1906 in Dayton and is buried at West Point.
Brigadier General Milo Smith Hascall Brigadier - Commander 15th Brigade 6th Division 2nd Corps

Brigadier General Milo Smith Hascall – Commander 15th Brigade 6th Division 2nd Corps Hascall was born in the village of LeRoy, Genesse County, NY on August 5, 1829. He would move to Goshen, IN where he was a store clerk and taught school prior to entering West Point. Hascall graduated in 1852 to be assigned to garrison duty in Newport, RI. Resigning from the army in 1853, he returned to Goshen and studied law. He was a clerk of courts and district attorney in Goshen. On June 12, 1861, Hascall became Colonel of the 17th Indiana. His regiment was involved in the siege of Corinth. Advancement to Brigadier General would come on April 25, 1862. Following Perryville, he held a division command for Stones River. He was transferred to the Army of the Ohio in Indiana and returned to Tennessee with General Burnside to defend Knoxville in 1863. Hascall resigned from the army on October 27, 1864. He returned to Goshen and became a banker. In 1890, he moved to Chicago and entered the real estate business. He died in Oak Park, Illinois on August 30, 1904 and is buried in Forest Home Cemetery in Forest Park, IL.
Colonel Charles Garrison Harker - Commander 20th Brigade 6th Division 2nd Corps

Charles Harker was born in Swedesboro, New Jersey on December 2, 1835. At the age of 12 he was orphaned and became a store clerk in Mullice Hill, NJ. An 1858 graduate of West Point, he served on the northwestern frontier. He was commissioned Colonel of the 65th Ohio Volunteer Infantry on November 11, 1861. Harker's biggest contribution to the war was the defense of Snodgrass Hill at the Battle of Chickamauga. He was promoted to Brigadier General on April 10, 1864 and was in the Atlanta Campaign. General Harker was mortally wounded at Kennesaw Mountain leading a charge on June 26, 1864. He is buried in New Episcopel Cemetery in Swedesboro, NJ.
Colonel George Day Wagner - Commander 21st Brigade 6th Division 2nd Corps

Born on September 22, 1829 in Ross County, Ohio, Wagner was moved as an infant to Warren County, Indiana. He would serve as an Indiana State Legislator and State Senator prior to his service in the Civil War. On June 14, 1861, he was commissioned Colonel of the 15th Indiana. He would see action at Shiloh, Perryville and Stones River. He was promoted to Brigadier General on April 4, 1863 and continued his service with the Army of the Cumberland. Wagner's reputation suffered from his decision not to withdraw his unit when they were serving as skirmishers at Franklin, TN in November 1864. On December 9, 1864, he was relieved from duty at his own request. He returned to Indiana to practice law in Williamsport. Wagner died on February 13, 1869 and is buried in Armstrong Cemetery in Warren County, IN.
Colonel Edward Moody McCook - Commander Cavalry Brigade 2nd Corps

McCook was born on June 15, 1833 in Steubenville, Ohio. He was locally educated and when he was 16 he moved to Colorado and became an early Pike's Peak settler. McCook became an attorney. At the start of the Civil War, McCook was appointed as a lieutenant in the 2nd Indiana Cavalry. He rose to be the major, lieutenant colonel and colonel of the regiment. On April 27, 1864 he would be promoted to Brigadier General and Major General in 1865. He resigned for the army in1866. McCook would serve as Minister to Hawaii for 3 years and be appointed as territorial governor of Colorado from 1869 to 1875 when he retire from public life. During his life McCook would be the largest taxpayer in Colorado. He died on September 9, 1909 in Chicago and is buried in Union Cemetery in Steubenville.
Acting Major General Charles Champion Gilbert - Commander 3rd Corps Army of the Ohio

Charles Gilbert was born in Zanesville, Ohio on March 1, 1822. He graduated with the 1846 class from the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, NY. During the Mexican War, he was at the siege of Vera Cruz. After the Mexican War, he was an instructor at West Point from 1850 to 1855. During the Civil War, Gilbert saw action at Wilson's Creek, where he was wounded. Gilbert would be condemned for failing to support McCook during the Battle of Perryville by the Buell Commission. He would not hold another field command during the war. His general's commission expired on March 4, 1863. He would continue to serve as a major in the 19th Infantry. In 1868, Gilbert was advanced to Lieutenant Colonel and to Colonel in 1881. Charles Gilbert would retire in 1886. He died in Baltimore, MD on January 17, 1903 and is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville, KY.
Brigadier General Albin Francisco Schoepf - Commander 1st Division 3rd Corps

Albin Schoepf was born in Podgorz, Poland on March 1, 1822. He was educated in Vienna and was a Captain in the Austrian Army. In 1848, he defected to the Hungarian revolutionists. Following the defeat, he escaped to Syria and then to the United States in 1851. Schoepf was a porter in a Washington hotel when he met John Holt, the Commissioner of Patents. Holt offered him a clerkship in the office. At the start of the Civil War, Schoepf followed Holt to the War Department and received a commission as Brigadier General on September 30, 1861 and sent to Kentucky. He defeated the Confederates at the Battle of Wildcat Mountain in October 1861. He was with George Thomas at the Battle of Mill Springs. After Perryville, Schoepf was rolled out with Gilbert. He was assigned to command at Fort Delaware for the remainder of the war. He mustered out of the army January 15, 1866. Returning to the Patent Office, Schoepf rose to become Chief Examiner. He died at home in Hyattsville, MD on May 10, 1886 and is buried in Congressional Cemetery in Washington,
D.C. Colonel Moses B. Walker - Commander 1st Brigade 1st Division 3rd Corps

Brigadier General Speed Smith Fry - Commander 2nd Brigade 1st Division 3rd Corps

Speed Fry was born in what in now Boyle County, KY on September 9, 1817. He attended Centre College in Danville, KY and graduated from Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana in 1840. He studied law and was admitted to the Bar in 1843. During the Mexican War, he help recruit and served as captain in the 2nd KY Infantry. Post war, Fry was County Judge in Boyle County fro 1857 until 1861. The start of the Civil War found him elected as Colonel of the Union Militia and then Colonel of the 4th KY in October 1861. He served at Mill Springs, where he was accused of murdering Confederate General Felix Zollicoffer. He was advanced to Brigadier General on March 21, 1862. Following the Battle of Perryville, he received a division command for Stones River but was not engaged. Fry was assigned to garrison duty at Camp Nelson after the Battle of Stones River. He mustered out of the army on August 24, 1865. From 1869 until 1872, he served as Supervisor of Internal Revenue for Kentucky. Speed Fry died on August 1, 1892 near Louisville, KY where he was the Superintendent of the Soldier's Home. He is buried in Danville, KY.
Brigadier General James Blair Steedman - Commander 3rd Brigade 1st Division 3rd Corps

Born in Northumberland County, PA on September 29, 1817, he grew up receiving no formal education, but did learn the printing trade. He served in the Texas Army during the Mexican War. After the war, Steedman would be legislator in Ohio, a 49er in the California gold rush, and owner of the Toledo Times. In 1857, he was designated public printer of the U.S. government. The start of the Civil War saw him elected Colonel of the 14th Ohio on April 27, 1861, a ninety-day unit. The unit re-enlisted for three years and was in action at Philippi, WV. Steedman was advanced to Brigadier General on July 17, 1862. Steedman and his unit were at Perryville and Stones River. Steedman is credited with performing the most conspicuous act of personal courage recorded by any army officer during the Battle of Chickamauga. He was promoted to Major General on April 20, 1864. He commanded a provisional division of 11 regiments during the Battle of Nashville. Steedman resigned his commission on August 18, 1866 to become the Collector of Internal Revenues at New Orleans. He would edit a paper in Toledo, served as an Ohio State Senator and be Chief of Police in Toledo in May 1883. Steedman died on October 18, 1883 in Toledo and is buried Woodlawn Cemetery.
Brigadier General Robert Byington Mitchell - Commander 9th Division 3rd Corps

Mitchell was born on April 4, 1823 in Mansfield, OH. He studied law in Mount Vernon, OH and practiced law in Mansfield. He served as a lieutenant in the 2nd Ohio during the Mexican War. In 1855, Mitchell was elected mayor of Mount Gilead, OH. He then moved to Kansas and became treasurer for the territory. At the start of the Civil War, he was commissioned Colonel of the 2nd Kansas and fought at Wilson's Creek. He rose to Brigadier General on April 8, 1862. Following his service during the Kentucky Campaign, he was assigned as Chief of Cavalry for the Army of the Cumberland. He was on Court Martial duty in Washington during the Battle of Chickamauga and was in Nashville for the Battle of Chattanooga. From 1964 to 1865, Mitchell had command of the Departments of Nebraska, North Kansas and Kansas. He mustered out of Federal service on January 15, 1866. He was appointed to the governorship of the New Mexico Territory, but did not take the job seriously. He resigned in 1869. Mitchell died on January 26, 1882 in Washington, D.C. and is buried in Arlington.
Colonel Michael Gooding - Commander 13th Brigade 9th Division 3rd Corps

Colonel William P. Carlin - Commander 31st Brigade 9th Division 3rd Corps

William Carlin was born near Carrollton, Illinois on November 24, 1829. Following his graduation from West Point in 1850, he was assigned to garrison duty with the 6th US Infantry. On August 15, 1861, Carlin was commissioned Colonel of the 38th Illinois serving initially in southwest Missouri. He was promoted to Brigadier General in November 1862. He served with the Army of the Ohio and Cumberland through the Carolina Campaign and received the brevet to Major General in 1865. He served as Assistant Commissioner of the Freedman's Bureau from 1867 to 1868. On May 17, 1893 he received his advancement to Brigadier General in the regular Army and retired. Carlin moved to Spokane, Washington. He died on a train near Whitehall, Montana on October 4, 1903 and is buried in Carrollton, IL.
Colonel William W. Caldwell - Commander 32nd Brigade 9th Division 3rd Corps

Brigadier General Philip Henry Sheridan - Commander 11th Division 3rd Corps

Phil Sheridan was born in Albany, NY according to his memoirs, but he reported several birthplaces during his life. He was born on March 6, 1831. His family moved to Somerset, OH when he was an infant. He was in the West Point Class of 1852, but graduated with the Class of 1853. Sheridan saw service on the frontier. At the beginning of the Civil War, he was Chief Quartermaster and Commissary in southwest Missouri. Henry Halleck assigned him duties as his Quartermaster. Following the capture of Corinth, MS Sheridan received a commission as Colonel of the 2nd Michigan Cavalry. He performance at Booneville, MS attracted attention from Halleck and Grant. He was promoted to Brigadier General on September 13, 1862. The Battle of Perryville was his first infantry command. Sheridan performance at Stone's River was outstanding. He would be advance to Major General on March 16, 1863. He again demonstrated his skills at the Battle of Chickamauga. When U. S. Grant was promoted to Lieutenant General in March 1864, he brought Sheridan east to command the cavalry for the Army of the Potomac. Sheridan is credited with the defeat of JEB Stuart at Yellow Tavern in May 1864. He again produced results commanding the Union forces in the Shenandoah Valley in the fall of 1864. After the war, he was given command of the 5th Military District in Louisiana and Texas. He advances to Lieutenant General in 1869 and to Command of the Army in 1884. His final promotion to General was on June 1, 1888. Sheridan died August 5, 1888 in Nonquitt, Massachusetts and is buried in Arlington.
Lieutenant Colonel Bernard Laiboldt - Commander 35th Brigade 11th Division 3rd Corps

Colonel Daniel McCook Jr. - Commander 36th Brigade 11th Division 3rd Corps

Daniel McCook was born in Carrollton, Ohio on July 22, 1834. He attended Alabama University in Florence, Alabama and graduated in 1858. He studied law in Steubenville, Ohio and in 1860, McCook moved to Leavenworth, KS and practice law with W. T. Sherman. At the start of the war he became Captain in the 1st Kansas Infantry and fought at Wilson's Creek. On July 15, 1862 he became Colonel of the 52nd Ohio. He was a brigade command under Sherman for the Corinth Campaign. McCook would miss the Battle of Stones River, but during the Atlanta Campaign, he was wounded in the June 27th attack at Kennesaw Mountain. He died as a result of the wound in his brother's home in Steubenville, Ohio on July 17, 1864. He is buried in the family plot at Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati, OH.
Colonel Nicholas Greusel - Commander 37th Brigade 11th Division 3rd Corps